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Chon-Ji

Chon-Ji means "Heaven and Earth." It is, in the Orient, interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of human history, therefore, it is the initial pattern learned by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts-one to represent the Heaven and the other the Earth – followed by a short, ending part which represents humanity.

Download Instructions in PDF format

Ready Position - Parallel Ready Stance, facing North

  1. From the Ready Position, turn left to form a Left Walking Stance toward the West while executing a Low Block with the left forearm.
  2. Move the right foot forward to form a Right Walking Stance while executing a middle punch with the right fist.
  3. Turn to the right to face the opposite direction to form a Right Walking Stance toward the East while executing a Low Block with the right forearm.
  4. Move the left foot forward to form a Left Walking Stance toward the East while executing a middle punch with the left fist.
  5. Turn left to form a Left Walking Stance towards the North while executing a Low Block with the left forearm.
  6. Move the right foot forward to form a Right Walking Stance toward the North while executing a middle punch with the right fist.
  7. Turn to the right to face the opposite direction to form a Right Walking Stance toward the South while executing a Low Block with the right forearm.
  8. Move the left foot forward to form a Left Walking Stance while executing a middle punch with the left fist.
  9. Turn to the left to form a Right L-Stance toward the East while executing a Middle Block with the left inner forearm.
  10. Move the right foot forward to form a Right Walking Stance toward the East while executing a middle punch with the right fist.
  11. Turn to the right to face the opposite direction to form a Left L-Stance toward the West while executing a Middle Block with the right inner forearm..
  12. Move the left foot forward to form a Left Walking Stance toward the West while executing a middle punch with the left fist.
  13. Turn to the left to form a Right L-Stance to the South while executing a Middle Block with the left inner forearm..
  14. Move the right foot forward to form a Right Walking Stance toward the South while executing a middle punch with the right fist.
  15. Turn to the right to face the opposite direction to form a Left L-Stance toward the North while executing a Middle Block with the right inner forearm.
  16. Move the left foot forward to form a Left Walking Stance toward the North while executing a middle punch with the left fist.
  17. Move the right foot forward to form a Right Walking Stance toward the North while executing a middle punch with the right fist.
  18. Move the right foot backward to form a Left Walking Stance toward the North while executing a middle punch with the left fist.
  19. Move the left foot backward to form a Right Walking Stance toward the North while executing a middle punch with the right fist.

End: Bring the left foot forward to the starting position, facing North.

Notes:

  • Make sure that you step far enough to get the correct length of each stance
  • "Chamber" the blocks as you turn and execute the block as you move forward
  • Don't rush the last four punches; they should be executed at the same rhythm as all the other techniques in this pattern
  • Pay attention to your posture; your back should be straight and upright
  • While each technique should be executed quickly, the pause between each technique should not get rushed; each technique should be fully completed before the pause begins
  • Although the notes in these instructions describes various “intermediate positions” as you move from technique to technique, there should be no pause between when these intermediate positions are formed and when the techniques are executed
  • Make sure to demonstrate the slight down-up-down (sinewave) movement with each technique; in general, the top of the sinewave is reached when each intermediate position is formed and we drop into the last part of the sinewave as we execute each technique

Other Reources

Chon-Ji Tul performed by Jaroslaw Suska (5th Degree)

Official ITF video for Chon-Ji Tul

Chon-Ji Tul performed by Grandmaster S.J. Kim

General Choi instructing Chon-Ji Tul

The History Behind "Chon-Ji"

The literal meaning of Chon-Ji is "Heaven and Earth." In the orient, "Chon-Ji" refers to a legend that describes the creation of the world and the beginning of human history. This pattern is appropriately named because the legend of Chon-Ji refers to the starting point of all things and this pattern is the starting point for the Taewkon-do patterns.

Specifically, "Chon-Ji" refers to Lake Chon-J, the ‘Heavenly Lake’, located in a crater on Baekdu Mountain. This lake, which located on the border between China and North Korea, is said to be the first residency of the legendary founder of Korea, Dan-Gun, before he established his capital at Asadal (now Pyongyang) in 2333 B.C. Lake Chon-Ji is considered the spiritual home of the Korean people. As Korea herself traces her beginnings to Chon-Ji so the student begins with this pattern.

There are 19 movements in Chon-Ji which represent the 10 grades (gup's) of colored belts and 9 degrees (dan's) of black belts in the Taekwon-Do system to identify rank.

As the student performs the movements of this pattern, they form a cross-shaped diagram which represents the four opposing elements of the universe: fire & water and air & earth. These elements are shown as symbols on the Korean national flag as black bars. Each of the symbols used, called Trigrams, have multiple meanings. The three bar trigram denotes air but also indicates Heaven and justice. The four bar trigram denotes fire and also the Sun and fruition. The five bar trigram denotes water as well as the Moon and wisdom and the six bar trigram denotes earth, the Earth itself and vitality. In the center of the Korean flag is the Taeguk symbol which represents the concept of Yin-Yang. The Taeguk was powerful symbol of Korean independence during the Japanese occupation of Korea.

flag of Korea


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