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Joong-Geun

Diagram for Joong-geun

Joong-Geun (32 movements)
Joong-Geun is named after the patriot Ahn Joong-Geun who assassinated Hirobumi Itō, the first Japanese governor-general of Korea, known as the man who played the leading part in the Korea-Japan merger. There are 32 movements in this pattern to represent Mr. Ahn's age when he was executed at Lui-Shung Prison in 1910.

Download Instructions with competition notes in PDF format

Movements - 32
Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE B

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a middle block to B with the left reverse knife-hand.

  2. Execute a low side front snap kick to B with the left foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 1.

  3. Lower the left foot to B and then move the right foot to B forming a left rear foot stance toward B while executing an upward block with a right palm.

  4. Move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance toward A, at the same time executing a middle block to A with a right reverse knife-hand.

  5. Execute a low side front snap kick to A with the right foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 4.

  6. Lower the right foot to A and then move the left foot to A forming a right rear foot stance toward A while executing an upward block with a left palm.

  7. Move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

  8. Execute a right upper elbow strike while forming a left walking stance toward D, slipping the left foot to D.

  9. Move the right foot to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

  10. Execute a left upper elbow strike while forming a right walking stance toward D, slipping the right foot to D.

  11. Move the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a high vertical punch to D with a twin fist.

  12. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing an upset punch to D with a twin fist.
    Ki-Hap

  13. Move the right foot on line CD and then turn counter clockwise to form a left walking stance toward C while executing a rising block with an X-fist.

  14. Move the left foot to E forming a right L-stance toward E while executing a high side strike to E with the left back fist.

  15. Twist the left fist counter clockwise until the back fist faces downward, at the same time forming a left walking stance toward E, slipping the left foot to E.

  16. Execute a high punch to E with the right fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward E. Perform 15 and 16 in a fast motion.

  17. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to F, forming a left L-stance toward F while executing a high side strike to F with a right back fist.

  18. Twist the right fist clockwise until the back fist faces downward, at the same time forming a right walking stance toward F, slipping the right foot to F.

  19. Execute a high punch to F with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward F. Perform 18 and 19 in a fast motion.

  20. Bring the right foot to the left foot and then move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a high block to C with a left double forearm.

  21. Execute a middle punch to C with the left fist while forming a right L-stance toward C, pulling the left foot.

  22. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.

  23. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a high block to C with the right double forearm.

  24. Execute a middle punch to C with the right fist while forming a left L-stance toward C, pulling the right foot.

  25. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the left foot.

  26. Lower the left foot to C forming a right L-stance toward C while executing amiddle guarding block to C with the forearm.

  27. Execute a pressing block with the right palm while forming a left low stance toward C, slipping the left foot to C. Perform in slow motion.

  28. Move the right foot to C forming a left L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with the forearm.

  29. Execute a pressing block with the left palm while forming a right low stance toward C, slipping the right foot to C. Perform in a slow motion.

  30. Bring the left foot to the right foot forming a closed stance toward A while executing an angle punch with the right fist. Perform in slow motion.

  31. Move the right foot to A forming a right fixed stance toward A while executing a U-shape block to A.

  32. Bring the right foot to the left foot and then move the left foot to B forming a left fixed stance toward B, at the same time executing a U-shape block to B.

END: Bring the left foot back to a ready posture.

Other Reources

The History Behind "Joong-Geun"

DanJi Alliance

Following the example of others throughout Korean history, An Jung-geun and 10 of his compatriots in the "DanJi Alliance" cut off the last joint from the left ring fingers, to indicate their dedication to their cause.

Whenever An wrote calligraphic banners to inspire his fellow patriots, as part of his signature he included his hand print showing the shortened finger so as to inspire others by his conviction.

Ahn Joong-geun was a Korean patriot and martyr who sacrificed himself for the cause of peace. He did this by assassinating Itō Hirobumi, the first Japanese governor-general of Korea as a way to end his corrupt rule and to help foster peace and cooperation amongst the countries of East Asia. Although his act of shooting Ito Hirobumi did not have an immediate impact on Japan's brutal annexation of Korea, Ahn's act of patriotism served as a source of inspiration to the loyalists and to the independence fighters throughout the Japanese occupation.

To understand Ahn's actions, it is useful to understand Ahn's early years and the history of Korea during Ahn's lifetime.

Ahn Jung-geun was born, in 1879, in the north-west section of the Korean Peninsula. As a boy, he learned Chinese literature and Western sciences, but was more interested in martial arts and marksmanship. In his late teenage years, he converted to Christianity, which was gaining popularity in Korea, and was baptized into the Catholic faith on January 10, 1897, receiving the baptismal name Thomas. He spent several years working fervently as a Catholic missionary, studying the faith further with the foreign Catholic missionaries serving in the region.

During this time, Korea was formally ruled by the Joseon Dynasty but was effectively a client kingdom of the Chinese Qing Dynasty. Towards the end of the 19th century, influence over Korea was increasingly an area of conflict between the Qing and Japan. The end of the First Sino-Japanese War in 1895 marked the rapid decline of any power the Joseon state had managed to hold against foreign interference, as the battles of the conflict itself had been fought on Korean soil and the surrounding seas. With its newfound preeminence over the waning and weak Qing dynasty, Japan had delegates negotiate the Treaty of Shimonoseki with the Qing dynasty. Through signing the treaty, a move designed to prevent the southern expansion of Russia, Japan wrested control over Chinese lands and, more importantly, over Korea.

Russia recognized this agreement as an act against its interests in northeastern China which led, in part, to the Russo-Japanese War in 1904. By 1905, the Japanese military achieved a comprehensive victory over the Russians. Following Imperial Japan's victory in this conflict, which surrendered Manchuria to the Russian sphere of influence in exchange for the acceptance of Japanese hegemony in Korea, and the Taft–Katsura Agreement, in which the United States allegedly agreed not to interfere with Japan in matters concerning Korea, the Japanese government sought to formalize its control over the Korean Peninsula.

Prince Itō Hirobumi was a Japanese statesman and considered one of the "founding fathers" of modern Japan. He wielded considerable power, serving as an Imperial advisor and as Japan's Prime Minister four times. He was instrumental in negotiating surrender terms in both the First Sino-Japanese and the Russo-Japanese wars. He convinced Japan's Emperor Meiji that the Korean people and their emperor desired close ties with Japan – even though this was far from the truth.

On November 9, 1905, Itō Hirobumi delivered a letter from the Emperor of Japan to Gojong Gwangmuje, Emperor of Korea, asking him to sign a treaty that would make Korea a protectorate of Imperial Japan. The Korean emperor refused since the treaty deprived Korea of its diplomatic sovereignty, would strip Korea of its rights as an independent nation, gave Imperial Japan complete responsibility for Korea's foreign affairs, and placed all trade through Korean ports under Imperial Japanese supervision. As a result, Itō Hirobumi ordered Japanese troops to encircle the Korean imperial palace and threatened the Emperor in order to force him to agree to the treaty. Gojong continued to refuse. Eventually, he was forced to abdicate and a puppet government was installed that signed the treaty in secret.

Itō Hirobumi was named the first Japanese Resident General of Korea. He was answerable only to the Japanese emperor and had the power to control all the Korean foreign relations and trade. To fulfil his duties and to keep order in the country, he was given total access to all Japanese combat troops stationed in Korea. Word soon leaked out concerning the secretly signed "Protectorate Treaty," provoking a waves of anti-Japanese violence. Although the Korean people were extremely irritated, the puppet government in Korea enacted laws that only exasperated the situation, such as allowed Korean land to be sold to Japanese without Korean consent – although the land generally was just taken. Violence pervaded the general population, as many loyal Korean government officials committed suicide and Korean government officials who had signed the treaty were assassinated.

Like many Christians in Korea at this time, Ahn became active in the Korean independence movement, protesting against Japan's increasing control over Korea. He promised his dying father that he would dedicate himself to the cause of independence, pledging that he would not drink alcohol until the day Korea was free from Japanese control. Ahn went into self-exile in southern Manchuria where he formed a small private guerrilla army of approximately 300 men, including his brother. This army conducted sporadic raids across the Manchurian border into northern Korea, keeping a relentless pressure on the Japanese in this region.

Russia was becoming very nervous at the level of Japanese activity in the northern Korean area and Japan's obvious designs on Manchuria. Ito, who had officially become the president of the Japanese Senate, arranged to meet with Russian representatives at Harbin, Manchuria, to calm their fears over the Japanese intentions to annex Manchuria and invade China. The final plans for the meeting between Ito and a Russian government official were announced to take place on October 26, 1909.

That morning, when Itō Hirobumi arrived at the train station in Harbin, China, Ahn Joong-geun was waiting for him. Ahn shot Ito as he exited the train and then he gave himself up without any resistance. Ahn stated "I, as a lieutenant general of the Korean resistance army, killed the criminal Ito Hirobumi because he disturbed the peace of the Orient and estranged the relationship between Korea and Japan. I hoped that if Korea and Japan be friendlier and are ruled peacefully, they would be a model all throughout the five continents. I did not kill Ito misunderstanding his intentions."

Ahn was given a trial but the trial itself was mostly a farce since the Foreign Ministry had ordered the judiciary to find Ahn guilty and assign the death penalty before the trial had even begun. Ahn was given the opportunity to speak briefly at the trial and tried to present the defense that that Itō's actions in Korea were themselves criminal and that Ahn had, therefore, acted justly in using violence against him. Ahn composed a list of 15 crimes committed by Ito, which included forcing the Emperor Gojeong of Korea to abdicate, forcibly seizing political power, seizing railroads, mines, and land, deceiving the world by saying that Korea wanted to be protected by Japan, and of tricking the emperor of Japan into thinking that things in Korea were peaceful and without incident when in fact there is unrest and slaughter.

By listing these crimes, Ahn tried to demonstrate that Japan's colonization of Korea was illegitimate and that Korean government was, in reality, Itō's private state. During his trial, Ahn stated that he was not a "common assassin" but, rather, "a prisoner of war." He argued that because Itō had illegally seized control of the Korean government under the guise of legal treaties, Ahn and other Koreans had taken up arms on behalf of a government that could no longer protect them, or even itself, thereby appropriating the state's right to legitimately utilize lethal violence. Killing Itō was, in short, not Ahn's final goal, but a means toward that goal. Ahn believed that Itō was a rogue official following his own policies rather than faithfully serving his Emperor. Now that Itō was disposed of and his "lies" had been revealed, Ahn believed the Japanese Emperor would reform his country's policies and foster peace in the region.

As expected, Ahn was found guilty and was sentenced to death. Ahn was not disturbed by the sentence and as he was waiting for the sentence to be carried out, Ahn wrote "On Peace in East Asia" to describe this thoughts on how peace should be achieved in the region. He proposed that Korea, China and Japan form a confederation "of politics, economy and culture" – much like today's European Union – with the creation of a joint bank, the use of a common currency, military cooperation, and "respect each other's independence." Ahn's vision for Asia included unifying the three empires so as to counter and fight off European colonialism, restoring peace to East Asia. He had hoped that with the death of Ito, Japan and Korea could become friendly because of the many traditions that they shared. He hoped that this friendship, along with good relations with China, would become a model for the world to follow. Ahn explained that "if the emperors of the three countries of Japan, China, and Korea were to meet with the Roman Pope, take their oaths together, and then be crowned by him, the world would be astounded by the news." The legitimacy that papal coronation would bring to these East Asian nations would prevent Western countries from threatening them, Ahn believed, leading not only to peace in the region, but throughout the world.

The assassination of Itō Hirobumi, like so many other actions by Korean patriots, seemed to only serve to fuel the fires of Japanese oppression. In 1910, the office of resident general, with Ito's successor now in charge, was changed to governor general to allow a more dictatorial approach to the total control of Korea. Akashi Genjiro was named as the commander of the Japanese military and police superintendent in Korea. He launched an extremely harsh campaign to harass the Korean population. He closed all newspapers, disbanded all patriotic organizations, arrested thousands of Korean leaders, and enforced a strict military rule of the capital city of Seoul by crack Japanese combat troops. This type of rule under the Japanese continued in Korea until Japan surrendered at the end of World War II. The sacrifice of Ahn Joong-Gun was one of many in this chaotic time in Korean history. His attitude and that of his compatriots symbolized the loyalty and dedication of the Korean people to their country’s independence and freedom. Joong-Geun's love for his country was forever captured in the calligraphy he wrote in his cell in Lui-Shung Prison prior to his execution. It simply said, "The Best Rivers and Mountains." This implied that he felt his country was the most beautiful on earth. Although his roles spanned from educator to guerrilla leader, he was, above all, a great Korean patriot.

On Mar. 26, 1910, Ahn Jung-geun was executed at the age of 32. He faced his death proudly and moved many, including Japanese prison guards who were with him until the end. Ahn's mother supported his action and said it was his duty as a Korean to dedicate his life for the country. Although his act of shooting Ito Hirobumi did not have an immediate impact on Japan's progress toward annexation of Korea, An's act of patriotism served as a source of inspiration to the loyalists and independence fighters throughout the Japanese occupation. For his actions as a resistance fighter, An Jung-geun was awarded South Korea's Order of Merit for National Foundation in 1962. In 2009, the Chinese and South Korean governments have recently announced the building of a new monument to An Jung-Geun in Harbin.

Even now, the spirit of Ahn Jung-geun still lives on.



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